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How to Become an Ethical Hacker

Do viruses, DDoS attacks, or buffer overflows tickle your fancy? If so, you might consider becoming a legal hacker, aka an ethical hacker, "white hat" hacker, or penetration tester.

Businesses and government-related organizations that are serious about their network security hire ethical hackers and penetration testers to help probe and improve their networks, applications, and other computer systems with the ultimate goal of preventing data theft and fraud. You may not get the same adrenaline rush that you might with underground hacking, but you can earn a good and honest living--and not end up facing prison time, as some illegal "black hat" hackers do.

How does the job market look like for ethical hackers? Extremely good! The IT market overall continues to grow despite the current economic turmoil. Research firm Gartner estimates that worldwide enterprise IT spending grew by 5.9 percent between 2009 and 2010, to a total of $2.7 trillion. At the same time, security is becoming a more pressing concern. Gartner expects to see an increase of nearly 40 percent in spending on worldwide security services during the five-year period from 2011 to 2015, eventually surpassing $49.1 billion.

In your first years as an ethical hacker, you'll be in a position to earn anywhere from $50,000 to $100,000 per year, depending on the company that hires you, and on your IT experience and education. With several years of professional experience, you could command $120,000 or more per year, especially if you do your own independent consulting.

You can't just dive into an ethical hacker position, however. Without IT security experience, you won't get very far, even with degrees and certifications. As is true for other IT jobs, employers typically want candidates who have college degrees, but related experience is king. And experience with certifications can typically take the place of some degree requirements.

 
Eric Egeier 07 10 13 - 12:07 | | Computer Security | No comments

             
             

How to Become an Ethical Hacker

Do viruses, DDoS attacks, or buffer overflows tickle your fancy? If so, you might consider becoming a legal hacker, aka an ethical hacker, "white hat" hacker, or penetration tester.

Businesses and government-related organizations that are serious about their network security hire ethical hackers and penetration testers to help probe and improve their networks, applications, and other computer systems with the ultimate goal of preventing data theft and fraud. You may not get the same adrenaline rush that you might with underground hacking, but you can earn a good and honest living--and not end up facing prison time, as some illegal "black hat" hackers do.

How does the job market look like for ethical hackers? Extremely good! The IT market overall continues to grow despite the current economic turmoil. Research firm Gartner estimates that worldwide enterprise IT spending grew by 5.9 percent between 2009 and 2010, to a total of $2.7 trillion. At the same time, security is becoming a more pressing concern. Gartner expects to see an increase of nearly 40 percent in spending on worldwide security services during the five-year period from 2011 to 2015, eventually surpassing $49.1 billion.

In your first years as an ethical hacker, you'll be in a position to earn anywhere from $50,000 to $100,000 per year, depending on the company that hires you, and on your IT experience and education. With several years of professional experience, you could command $120,000 or more per year, especially if you do your own independent consulting.

You can't just dive into an ethical hacker position, however. Without IT security experience, you won't get very far, even with degrees and certifications. As is true for other IT jobs, employers typically want candidates who have college degrees, but related experience is king. And experience with certifications can typically take the place of some degree requirements.

 
Eric Egeier 07 10 13 - 12:07 | |

             
             

Samsung flaw allows attackers to bypass Android lock screen

By Zack Whittaker

Summary: Tested on an Samsung Galaxy Note II with Android 4.1.2, an attacker can bypass the device's lock screen, albeit momentarily, to access functions and view data on the device.

 
Zack Whittaker 04 03 13 - 00:39 | | Computer Security | No comments

             
             

Facebook, Apple hacks could affect anyone: Here's what you can do

By Zack Whittaker

Summary: Reports suggest that both Facebook and Apple employees — and likely others, including Twitter — visited an infected website laden with malware, which exploited a vulnerability in Java. Now that the cause has been identified, here's what you can do.

 
Zack Whittaker 20 02 13 - 00:33 | | Computer Security | No comments

             
             

Patch Tuesday: IE at risk of malware attacks; 57 flaws in total

By Zack Whittaker

Summary: In the latest round of monthly patches from Microsoft, users of Internet Explorer should jump ship for the next few days as all versions of the browser are at risk of malware attacks.

Microsoft will release 12 patches for 57 vulnerabilities next week for Windows, Internet Explorer, and Office.

Microsoft's 'Blue' wave is coming to more than just Windows
 
 
 
Zack Whittaker 08 02 13 - 00:22 | | Computer Security | No comments

             
             

Intel Ethernet controller vulnerable to 'packet of death'

By Adrian Kingsley-Hughes

Intel Ethernet controller vulnerable to 'packet of death'

Summary: Sending a specially crafted packet to an Intel 82574L Ethernet controller can cause the hardware to hang, and the 'packet of death' could be put to malicious use and crash systems even when protected by a firewall.

(Credit: Intel)
 
Adrian Kingsley-Hughes 07 02 13 - 00:18 | | Computer Security | No comments
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Welcome to bullyware: Malware gets more aggressive in money hunt

By Larry Dignan

Summary: Fortinet is arguing that money making malware will take threats to a new level in 2013.

Cybercriminals are using malware to go beyond merely swiping passwords and actually "bullying infected users into paying," according to a Fortinet quarterly report on emerging threats.

fortiguard
 
Larry Dignan 04 02 13 - 00:09 | | Computer Security | No comments

             
             

Java update 'doesn't prevent silent exploits at all'

By Ben Woods

Summary: Holes still exist in Oracle's Java software that could potentially leave machines open to remote execution of malicious code, according to a researcher.

 
Ben Woods 28 01 13 - 22:31 | | Computer Security | No comments

             
             

How to disable Java in your browser on Windows, Mac

By Zack Whittaker

Summary: Amid a serious security flaw in the latest version of Java 7, where even the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has warned users to disable the plug-in, here's how you do it.

 
Zack Whittaker 13 01 13 - 01:29 | | Computer Security | No comments

             


 
RiCK | 10 03 13 - 22:23